Grevatt & Grevatt Catalogue

GREVATT & GREVATT

Non-Commercial Publisher & Bookseller

Established 30th November 1981

Regn. No. 2778246

Editor: S. Y. Killingley, BA, MA, PhD

9 Rectory Drive, Newcastle upon Tyne NE3 1XT, England

UK purchases must include 15% p & p (single-copy orders or orders below £3) or 10% (multiple-copy orders).

All poetry titles are supplied postfree to UK booksellers (33.3% trade discount).

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Sections:

A = Language and Linguistics;
B = Poetry;
C = Religion and Philosophy;
D = Society in India


If you are interested in courses on Chinese language and culture for beginners, Modern and Classical Chinese, or Chinese characters and calligraphy, email:
siew-yue.killingley@ncl.ac.uk

A. Language and Linguistics

short glossary of cantonese classifiers

A1. Killingley, Siew-Yue, A Short Glossary of Cantonese Classifiers.

0 9507918 0 6. £7.50 net (UK); £9.75 (overseas). 1982.

‘...a most useful little book...aimed less at the linguist and more at the language learner...Particularly helpful are the carefully pointed differences between classifiers which share a noun in common.’ Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies


If you are interested in courses on Chinese language and culture for beginners, Modern and Classical Chinese, or Chinese characters and calligraphy, email:
siew-yue.killingley@ncl.ac.uk

A2. Killingley, Siew-Yue, The Grammatical Hierarchy of Malayan Cantonese.

0 9508149 0 3. (S. Y. Killingley imprint.) £9.50 non-net (UK); £12.35 (overseas). 1982.

‘...an extensive catalog of Cantonese sentence, clause, phrase, and word types, presented in a tagmemic model ...The book will be extremely useful to anyone planning to undertake work on Cantonese syntax; typologists and students of Southeast Asian areal phenomena will find much of interest here...’ Language


If you are interested in courses on Chinese language and culture for beginners, Modern and Classical Chinese, or Chinese characters and calligraphy, email:
siew-yue.killingley@ncl.ac.uk

A3. Killingley, Siew-Yue, Cantonese Classifiers: Syntax and Semantics.

0 9507918 3 0. £10.00 net (UK); £13.00 (overseas). 1983.

‘Classifiers have attracted considerable attention lately, and Killingley’s monograph sets out to provide a detailed study of Cantonese classifiers in the light of current linguistic research on the topic...The monograph leaves few aspects of the topic untouched... ’ Language

‘Cette étude détaillée des classificateurs nominaux du cantonnais rendra de grands services aux sinologues ... aussi bien qu'aux généralistes ... ’ Bulletin de la Société de Linguistique de Paris


If you are interested in courses on Chinese language and culture for beginners, Modern and Classical Chinese, or Chinese characters and calligraphy, email:
siew-yue.killingley@ncl.ac.uk

A4. Killingley, Siew-Yue, A New Look at Cantonese Tones: Five or Six?

0 9508149 1 1. (S. Y. Killingley imprint.) £6.00 net (UK); £7.80 (overseas). 1985.

This essay questions the received six-tone theory dating back to the work of Daniel Jones in 1913 by exploring the possibility that this theory has been formulated without due consideration to factors such as speech (as opposed to writing) and phonology (as opposed to phonetics).

‘...Killingley has pointed to a thrilling problem, whose solution is of great importance to synchronical and diachronical studies, as well as to psycholinguistics.’ Lingua


If you are interested in courses on Chinese language and culture for beginners, Modern and Classical Chinese, or Chinese characters and calligraphy, email:
siew-yue.killingley@ncl.ac.uk

A5. Lesser, Ruth, and Trewhitt, Peter, An Annotated Bibliography of Verbal Materials: for Use in Psycholinguistic and Neurolinguistic Experimentation.

9507918 2 2. (Pub. for the Department of Speech, University of Newcastle.) £3.00 net (UK); £3.90 (overseas). 1982.

‘...of particular value to final year undergraduates and new graduates; but it is likely that it will have a width of appeal to many workers having to do with this field of interest.’ British Journal of Disorders of Communication

linguistics and linguistic evidence

A6. Robins, R. H. and Fromkin, Victoria A., Linguistics and Linguistic Evidence: The LAGB Silver Jubilee Lectures 1984.

0 947722 00 9. (Pub. for the Linguistics Association of Great Britain.) £6.00 net (UK); £7.80 (overseas). 1985.

Click here to find out more about the Linguistics Association of Great Britain (LAGB) and its conferences.

‘Robins’ [essay] displays the breadth and depth of reading in the history of this discipline that one has come to take for granted in his work...Both contributions...are appropriately authoritative...[The writers] are both infectiously optimistic and enthusiastic about the future of language studies on both sides of the Atlantic.’ Language

‘...a thorough and very objective survey of recent linguistics...compulsory reading for all those interested in the history and epistemology of linguistic theory and description.’ Leuvense Bijdragen

A7. Waterson, Natalie, Prosodic Phonology: The Theory and Its Application to Language Acquisition and Speech Processing.

0 947722 02 5. £16.00 (UK); £20.80 (overseas). 1987.

The only text-book which gives an explicit account of prosodic phonology, the first non-linear approach to phonology dating back to the days of J. R. Firth. Of interest to those whose work is in or spans the fields of phonetics, phonology, linguistics, neurology, psychology, language-teaching and speech therapy.

‘The field of child phonology has in recent years witnessed a dramatic shift toward lexical issues and word-level phonological analysis. This productive trend has run parallel to similar shifts within standard phonological theory, even anticipating them in certain respects by a margin of several years. Most of the credit for this is due ultimately to N. Waterson, a student of the renowned founder of the London school of linguistics, J. R. Firth. It was Waterson who first proposed the notion of whole-word phonetic “patterns” as a fundamental organizing principle in early speech development—a move which provided the impetus for much of the field’s progress over the past ten to fifteen years...[Her] refusal to fall into line with widely held ideas, agendas and presuppositions [has] made Waterson perhaps the single most crucial figure in the emergence of our current understandings of early child phonology...We can be grateful for this one-volume compilation of her contributions to the field. Like all classics, they will continue to bear rereading as the field progresses, and will no doubt periodically stimulate creative reformulations and fresh insights in a number of domains where prevailing orthodoxies have remained silent or unhelpful.’ Journal of Child Language

Usage of pronouns, address and relationship terms in Chinese

A8. Killingley, Siew-Yue, Usage of Pronouns, Address and Relationship Terms in Chinese.

0 947722 19 X. £10.00 (UK); £13.00 (overseas). 2003.

‘Pronoun systems in world languages have long been a central topic for scholarly research in linguistics. Chinese has a unique pronoun system that is under-explored and often misunderstood. Dr Siew-Yue Killingley’s study of Chinese pronouns is based on an empirical study. It charts the socio-historical development of the Chinese pronoun system and documents in detail contemporary usage of the system. The book also describes the address and relationship terms in Chinese, an intrinsic part of the Chinese language that has huge socio-cultural significance. The book is of immense value to the study of Chinese linguistics and Chinese culture. It should be read by anyone interested in this major language of the world and the cultural tradition that it represents.’

Professor Li Wei, Head of the School of Education, Communication and Language Sciences, University of Newcastle upon Tyne


If you are interested in courses on Chinese language and culture for beginners, Modern and Classical Chinese, or Chinese characters and calligraphy, email:
siew-yue.killingley@ncl.ac.uk

Learning to read Pinyin romanization and its equivalent in Wade-Giles

A9. Killingley, Siew-Yue, Learning to Pinyin Romanization and Its Equivalent in Wade-Giles

0 947722 20 3. £18.50 (UK) and £20.50 (overseas). 2004.

‘Hanyu Pinyin is the romanization system designed by language planners in mainland China in the 1950s. It is now widely used to transcribe Chinese in international documents. However, most of the important works on China before the 1950s used the Wade-Giles system. Any student of Chinese and China will encounter either or both systems in their course of study. Dr. Siew-Yue Killingley has written a truly user-friendly guide to Pinyin and Wade-Giles. Drawing on her vast experience as a linguist, scholar and teacher, Dr. Killingley takes the reader through all aspects of the two systems in a carefully thought-out way. Difficult concepts are introduced and explained with interesting and engaging examples. Students can be confident that after reading this book they will feel very much at home with Pinyin and Wade-Giles, which will be of enormous help in their future studies. A book of this kind is long overdue.’

Professor Li Wei, Head of the School of Education, Communication and Language Sciences, University of Newcastle upon Tyne


If you are interested in courses on Chinese language and culture for beginners, Modern and Classical Chinese, or Chinese characters and calligraphy, email:
siew-yue.killingley@ncl.ac.uk

Beginning Sanskrit, Volume 1

A10. Killingley, Dermot, Beginning Sanskrit, Volume 1, Second Edition

Revised by Dermot Killingley and Siew-Yue Killingley

0 947722 22 X. £18.50 (UK) and £20.50 (overseas). 2004.

The first volume of Beginning Sanskrit will introduce you to the sound system of the language, including sandhi, some of the basic features of noun and verb inflection, and the main outlines of syntax. It will also introduce you to a lively world of malicious crows, devious jackals, treacherous tigers, gullible brahmins, courteous lions and grateful mice: the ancient and still living world of Indian stories. The stories were told, so the story goes, to bring a king’s sons from ignorance to wisdom in six months.

‘This is the first of three volumes in this excellent introductory Sanskrit course intended for students taking Sanskrit as a part only of their studies. The sixty-five carefully graded lessons of the course are skilfully designed to take them from scratch to a reading knowledge of Sanskrit at a pace which makes assimilation of the material as simple as possible, even for those with no previous language experience...The way in which the features of the grammar are explained in clear and straightforward language is one of the great strengths of this work. Another particularly good feature is the selection of reading passages, which from an early stage are drawn from actual Sanskrit literature...bringing positive enjoyment into the learning process. Altogether, this course provides an ideal way into what can otherwise be a difficult language to learn.’

John Brockington, Professor of Sanskrit, University of Edinburgh

‘Dermot Killingley is to be warmly congratulated on the completion of his three-volume Beginning Sanskrit, written in close cooperation with the linguist Siew-Yue Killingley...The special character of Killingley’s innovative approach consists of the didactically well-designed gradual introduction of morphological, grammatical and syntactical features with plenty of examples, drills and exercises which together with the extensive readings didactically adapted from original literature enable the acquisition of the Sanskrit language and a basic vocabulary in an active and immediate, natural manner, as of a modern spoken language...Also for the instructor, using Beginning Sanskrit is a pleasure.’

Karin Preisendanz, Professor of Indology, Institute for South Asian, Tibetan and Buddhist Studies, University of Vienna



Beginning Sanskrit, Volume 2

A11. Killingley, Dermot, Beginning Sanskrit, Volume 2, Second Edition

Revised by Dermot Killingley and Siew-Yue Killingley

0 947722 23 8. £22.00 (UK) and £25.00 (overseas). 2004.

The first four lessons in this volume introduce the Devanagari script in stages, using material which will already be comprehensible if you have used Volume 1. The next lesson, and every lesson to the end of the course, includes a story in Devanagari which gives practice in what has been learnt, while introducing more vocabulary. As the course progresses, the stories become closer to their originals.

If you work steadily through this volume, you will be familiar with the script and the commonest kinds of noun and adjective inflection, in all three genders, three numbers and eight cases, including the distinctive pronominal inflection. You will be able to understand a long sentence built with a succession of passive as well as active participles. You will also know how the hare drowned the lion, why the snake took the frogs for a ride, how the cat’s diligence cost him his job, how to investigate a bell-ringing demon or a dubious holy man, how the prince got the merchant to lend him his wife, and why the flying turtle should have kept his mouth shut.

‘The grammatical terminology conforms to modern practice and avoids the traditional terms used in other primers, which can prove so formidable to beginners Another particularly good feature is the selection of reading passages,...often from the lively story collection of the Pañcatantra, adapted as necessary to fit the stage reached but bringing positive enjoyment into the learning process...Altogether, this course provides an ideal way into what can otherwise be a difficult language to learn.’

John Brockington, Professor of Sanskrit, University of Edinburgh

‘The special character of Killingley’s innovative approach consists of the didactically well-designed gradual introduction of morphological, grammatical and syntactical features with plenty of examples, drills and exercises which together with the extensive readings didactically adapted from original literature enable the acquisition of the Sanskrit language and a basic vocabulary in an active and immediate, natural manner, as of a modern spoken language.’

Karin Preisendanz, Professor of Indology, Institute for South Asian, Tibetan and Buddhist Studies, University of Vienna



Beginning Sanskrit, Volume 3

A12. Killingley, Dermot, Beginning Sanskrit, Volume 3

Revised by Dermot Killingley and Siew-Yue Killingley

0 947722 21 1. £18.50 (UK) and £20.50 (overseas). 2003.

The lessons in Volume 3 follow the same general pattern as those in the other two volumes. By the end of the book most of the grammatical features of Sanskrit, as found in classical texts, have been covered, as well as a vocabulary of about 1,200 words. At this stage, or sooner, it will be possible to embark on real literature

Because the linguistic material of Beginning Sanskrit is ordered according to pedagogical needs, it is not intended to be used as a reference grammar. However, the index on pages 220-4 shows where paradigms and other grammatical information are to be found in all three volumes, and also translates the terms used here into their approximate equivalents in the terminology of other books on Sanskrit.

The stories become longer as the course progresses, and are based on a wider range of literature, within the tradition of Sanskrit prose narrative. They also become closer to their originals. Some stories have been expanded, in order to provide practice in new grammatical features or new words, or more generally to conform to the length of the other stories. Verses have been included in most of the stories, to give experience of reading verse. Most of the verses are adapted from the original form (or one of the original forms) of the story in which they occur in this volume, but some have been adapted from other sources, or newly composed.

‘The sixty-five carefully graded lessons in the three volumes of this Sanskrit course are skilfully designed to take a student from scratch to a reading knowledge of Sanskrit at a pace which makes assimilation of the material as simple as possible, even for a student with no previous language experience. The way in which the features of the grammar are explained in clear and straightforward language is excellent. Another particularly good feature is the selection of reading passages, which from an early stage are drawn from actual Sanskrit literature (often the story collection of the Pañcatantra, adapted where necessary). Altogether, this course provides an ideal way into what can otherwise be a difficult language to learn.’

John Brockington, Professor of Sanskrit, University of Edinburgh

‘Dermot Killingley is to be warmly congratulated on the completion of his three-volume Beginning Sanskrit, written in close cooperation with the linguist Siew-Yue Killingley...As already evidenced by the first two volumes, the special character of Killingley’s innovative approach consists of the didactically well-designed gradual introduction of morphological, grammatical and syntactical features with plenty of examples, drills and exercises which together with the extensive readings didactically adapted from original literature enable the acquisition of the Sanskrit language and a basic vocabulary in an active and immediate, natural manner, as of a modern spoken language. Another remarkable feature of Killingley’s course is the introduction of elements of modern linguistic theory and his use of descriptive linguistic terminology, as opposed to the traditional grammatical terminology taken over from Classical Philology...I have to add that also for the instructor, using Beginning Sanskrit is a pleasure, and that the novel experience of teaching Sanskrit as one would teach a modern language (or a classical Western language according to a professionally written modern text book) greatly enhances one’s own competence in the language in more than one way and definitely changes one’s ‘feeling’ about it.’

Karin Preisendanz, Professor of Indology, Institute for South Asian, Tibetan and Buddhist Studies, University of Vienna


B. Poetry

Where No Poppies Blow

B1. Killingley, Siew-Yue, Where No Poppies Blow: Poems of War and Conflict.

0 9507918 5 7. £4.50 net (UK); £5.85 (overseas). 1983.

‘...The content is heartfelt; the approach is intellectual.' World Literature Today: A Literary Quarterly of the University of Oklahoma

‘Not only an indictment of war but also a consideration of the human attributes that lead towards conflict ... This is a thought-provoking collection... ’ Proof: Lincolnshire and Humberside Arts Diary

‘The perceptions in this collection do not merely explore the rationale for and effects of wars...They also register and reveal those incipient conflicts that confront individuals living on the edge of an ugly, cruel reality.’ Southeast Asian Review of English

Click here to see excerpts from Siew-Yue Killingley’s literary works on the VIOBA Homepage, including some of her teenage writings.

In Sundry Places

B2. Killingley, Siew-Yue, In Sundry Places: Views of Durham Cathedral.

0 947722 0 3 3. £2.00 non-net (UK); £2.60 (overseas). 1987.

Eleven poems arranged in five parts, being on the one hand a set of meditations on the part of the Christian pilgrim as he visits different parts of Durham Cathedral, and on the other a set of meditations on the part of the believer at various points of his life.

This work was awarded Second Prize by the Dean and Chapter of Durham in a competition held in 1982 as part of the Ninth Centenary Celebrations of Durham Cathedral.

Sound, Speech and Silence

B3. Killingley, Siew-Yue, Sound, Speech, and Silence: Selected Poems.

0 947722 08 4; £7.50 net (UK); £9.75 postfree (overseas); xii, 80 pp. July 1995.

This collection of poems gathers together observations and meditations on the nature of relationships in time, nature, religion, and between human beings. Sometimes the essence of these relationships is revealed in sound and speech; at other times it is reflected in silence. The meaningless prattle of dementia, the silent and noisy engagements of motherhood, the Passion narrative as a paradigm for human suffering, the empty utterances, linguistic barriers and silence of exile, estrangements and bereavement, the triumphalist trumpetings of power and war as well as the pure music of the singing human spirit are explored in these poems. Four Chinese poems are included, with transliterations and translations.

‘The translations [of the Chinese poems], although helpfully literal, show flexibility and understanding of the needs of an English reader who may not have training in Chinese. The [Chinese] poems are short, philosophical, memorable...Poetic sensitivity is clear, and makes its impact due to the cosmopolitan perspective of a sensitive writer. This summation barely hints at the magic of Sound, Speech, and Silence.’ World Literature Today: A Literary Quarterly of the University of Oklahoma


If you are interested in courses on Chinese language and culture for beginners, Modern and Classical Chinese, or Chinese characters and calligraphy, email:
siew-yue.killingley@ncl.ac.uk

Overhearing the incoherent

B4. McNamara, Michael, Overhearing the Incoherent: Selected Poems. 1997.

0 947722 09 2; £6.50 non-net (UK); £8.45 (overseas)

This selection of poems shows the poet experimenting with language in presenting various facets of time and memory. Michael McNamara observes with empathetic detachment the cruelties, joys and visions found in human and religious experience. The eternity of time past and time future, the enigma of changed or unrealized relationships and of death, the overheard and half-understood incoherence of a suffering Christ reflected in humanity—these are presented sparingly and without sentimentality in a variety of verse forms and techniques. Michael McNamara is equally at home in his control of sustained narrative as well as of lyrical precision in more song-like or atmospheric vignettes.

‘This is a fine collection, well put together by Grevatt & Grevatt, by a very talented writer.’ Target

‘The poems tend to be lyrical, almost mystical. When he does deal with his work, or rejection of it in the case of Military Prisoner, I am completely hooked...Other strong points are the often poignant love poems and the address to his schizophrenic son.’ New Welsh Review

Divided Attention

B5. Harvey, Roger. Divided Attention: Selected Poems. 1998.

0 947722 10 6; £6.50 non-net (UK); £8.45 (overseas)

Roger Harvey moves from boyhood memories to manhood in the North East of England, painting a life anchored in the landscape, seascape and skies of Northumberland. From his own cold, quiet corner of the world, he translates the reader by means of words and verbal pictures to complementary worlds in warmer climes. His acceptance and understanding of our common humanity compels the reader to join him in ‘celebrating a life of extraordinary things/in ordinary words’.

‘These late-twentieth-century North-east England state-of-the-cult poems have a lot to offer...Strongly felt and energetic, sometimes it all comes together as in THE RIVER GOD TYNE...A well designed book...I think this book is good value and I'll read any other poems I see by Roger Harvey--to see how he progresses, and to look for more insights into the North East psyche.’ New Hope International

Lent and Easter Cycle

B6. Killingley, Siew-Yue. Lent and Easter Cycle: Poems for Meditation. 1998.

0 947722 11 4; £4.00 non-net (UK); £5.00 (overseas)

The everyday events and settings recorded in these poems are both secular and ecclesiastical. They are linked to various biblical narratives as well as to stages of Christ’s progression from his birth to the cross, reflecting the Christian’s search for Christ in baptism and in other ways during his or her lifetime and when approaching death. This cycle of poems may be dipped into at random and read purely for enjoyment. For those who wish, it provides a focus for daily meditation during Lent and Eastertide. The illustrations of sixteenth-century woodcuts and engravings provide a further dimension for meditation.

Northumbrian Passion Play

B7. Killingley, Siew-Yue. Northumbrian Passion Play. 1999.

0 947722 12 2; £8.50 (UK); £11.00 (overseas)

Illustrated with engravings by Albrecht Dürer and others.

A version (abridged and adapted by the author at the request of the directors) first performed at All Saints’ Church, Gosforth in Newcastle from 21st to 24th April 1999.
Original unabridged version first performed by the St. Tom’s Players at the Church of St. Thomas the Martyr in Newcastle from 14th to 17th March 2001, with proceeds to St. Oswald’s Jigsaw Appeal, which raises funds to build a children’s section to St. Oswald’s Hospice in order to benefit children with life-limiting diseases.
Original version performed again by the St. Tom’s Players and Churches Together in Morpeth at St. George’s Church, Morpeth, Northumberland, from 23rd to 25th May 2002, also in aid of St. Oswald’s Jigsaw Appeal. Photographs from this production immediately below, reproduced by kind permission of Donald Dixon.

Northumbrian Passion Play Photographs

Act 1, Sc 1: Paul tells Everyman and Everywoman
that they have done their best for Judas
© Donald Dixon 2002

paul, everyman and everywoman

left to right: Paul (Dermot Killingley),
Everyman (Christopher Moad), Everywoman (Shirley Forster)








Act 1, Sc. 2: Judas is persuaded to betray Jesus
© Donald Dixon 2002

judas tempted

left to right: Judas (Charles Gardiner),
Priest (Ron Forster), Scribe-Pharisee (John Pearson)













Act 2: The Prodigal Son (as told by Everyman to Pilate)
© Donald Dixon 2002

prodigal

Jesus as Dad tells the older brother Steve that all he wants
is for him and his brother Keith to be happy. John and another
disciple look on while Scribe-Pharisee and Priest listen from above.

Left to right: Steve (Charles Gardiner), Jesus (Christopher Mullinder),
Disciple (Andrew Cleverley), Keith (David Graham), John (David Mayhew);
Above: Scribe-Pharisee (John Pearson), Priest (Ron Forster)




Act 3, Sc. 1: The Last Supper
© Donald Dixon 2002

last supper

left to right: Disciple (Andrew Cleverley,
Peter (David Graham), John (David Mayhew),
Jesus (Christopher Mullinder), Judas (Charles Gardiner),
Thomas (Humphrey Graham), Disciple (John Pearson)











Act 4, Sc 1: Jesus before Pilate
© Donald Dixon 2002

jesus before pilate

left to right: Roman Soldier (Steven Forster),
Jesus (Christopher Mullinder), Satan as Court Official
(Jared Johnson), Pilate (Humphrey Graham).

The basin and towel for Pilate to wash his hands after
condemning Jesus are on Pilate’s left.






Act 4, Sc. 1: The Crucifixion
© Donald Dixon 2002

crucifixion

Right: Mary (Lindy Conway) and John (David Mayhew) before the cross, and left to right: Everywoman (Shirley Forster), Second Thief (Andrew Cleverley), Jesus (Christopher Mullinder), First Thief (Jonny Carnell), Roman Soldier (Steven Forster), Roman Soldier (David Graham).

Everywoman says of Mary:
Her rose stem has grown, a broken reed
Bruised in the wind and wounded on rood;





Act 5, Sc 3: Dance of the bearers of the flame of Pentecost
© Donald Dixon 2002

pentecost dance

Dancers left to right: Sarah Pearson, Fay Vivian;
the risen Christ (back to the scene) turns round
at the end of the dance to lead the players and the
audience in the Lord’s Prayer in different languages.

Left to right apart from dancers: Everyman (Christopher Moad), Disciple (John Pearson), John (David Mayhew), Mary (half-hidden behind dancer: Lindy Conway), Jesus (Christopher Mullinder), Mary Magdalene (Madeline Cleverley), Disciple (Donald Scott), Peter (David Graham), Disciple (Andrew Cleverley), Everywoman (Shirley Forster).


Act 5, Sc. 3: Curtain-call
© Donald Dixon 2002

curtain-call

Front, left to right: Flautist (Siew-Yue Killingley), Everyman (Christopher Moad), Paul (Dermot Killingley), Everywoman (Shirley Forster);
Back, left to right: Disciple (John Pearson), Thomas (Humphrey Graham), John (David Mayhew), False witness (Chris Anderson), Soldier (Steven Forster), Dancer (Sarah Pearson), Mary (Lindy Conway), Jesus (Christopher Mullinder), Mary Magdalene (Madeline Cleverley), Dancer (Fay Vivian), Disciple (Donald Scott), Pilate’s servant (Alistair Gilfillan), Pilate’s wife (Jennifer Brown), First Thief (Jonny Carnell), Peter (David Graham).

After First Night
© Donald Dixon 2002

dermot, siew-yue, roderick

Left to right: Dermot Killingley (director and Paul), Siew-Yue Killingley (author and flautist), Roderick Oakes (composer);
The music was specially composed by Roderick Oakes for this production as well as for the 2001 Newcastle production.

Grateful thanks are due to Donald Dixon for kind permission to reproduce the above photographs from the Morpeth 2002 production.


See also below B. 12: John Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress.

Would you like to join the St. Tom's Players or hear more about their activities? Click here to find out more.

‘...clearly within the miracle (or mystery) play tradition which stretches back to the Middle Ages...Such was the complexity of the play, especially in its use of language but also in the competence of its execution that a review can only hope to touch on its achievements. This was a vigorous play, a passionate play, which brought the story of the cross to life, and captured the depths of human and divine love in poetic drama.’ The Newlink: The Monthly Newspaper of the Diocese of Newcastle

‘...Siew-Yue Killingley’s Northumbrian Passion Play is in the best traditions of the English medieval mystery cycles. For it is embedded in its own time and place, through the figure of Everyman and Everywoman, “a Geordie latter-day Adam and Eve couple”, utterly biblical, yet also very much a “drama” within the Christian story of salvation.

Dr Killingley is an accomplished poet, capable of writing within a range of styles and tones. The figure of Jesus himself moves through the play speaking in alliterative verse which beautifully sustains the tradition of the mystery plays of the fifteenth century. Around him, Killingley has created a world of other characters, notably Pilate and Pilate’s wife, which, with sensitive theological nicety, link the drama of the Passion with a contemporary world, achieving the purpose of such plays—which is to bring the mystery of salvation home to the present and the local.

The great medieval cycles were written and performed to bring the Bible to the people, and this, in her time, Killingley also achieves through her renderings, as “plays within the play” of the great parables of the Prodigal Son and the Good Samaritan. In the former, the resonances are clear as the Father speaks with the alliterative measure of Jesus himself, in contrast to the utterly contemporary tones of the brothers, replete with mobile phones and the hypodermic needles of the drug-culture.

...Local and universal experience are here combined in a play which, in its published form, is also beautifully illustrated with engravings and woodcuts by Albrecht Dürer and others, and placed within the context of poems by George Herbert. This is a sensitive and delicate piece of work which deserves to take its place within a great tradition of English writing as an expression of Christian faith which is also literature of its time and of all time.’ Journal of Literature and Theology

B8. Whitehead, A. K. Times and Seasons: Selected Poems. 2000.

0 947722 13 0; £7.50 (UK); £9.70 (overseas)

In this collection, Keith Whitehead explores the times and seasons experienced by the poet as he moves from sphere to sphere. Artistic activity, seasons of love, times of travel and of meeting people—these are all interwoven with poetic insight.

B9. Killingley, Dermot. A Pygmy Smile: Occasional and Intertextual Poems. 2000.

0 947722 14 9 £4.00 (UK); £5.20 (overseas)

Poets often take themselves too seriously and poetry can sometimes become precious and self-regarding. These poems are refreshingly absurd and help the reader to relax and feel good about the world as he or she joins in the gentle humour of a poet who does not take himself or his writing too seriously. These charming poems encourage us to smile at the frustrations of the computer, the complications of planned relaxation, the pseudo-procedures, syntax, and conundrums of academic administration, and much more.

Some of these poems refer to events, in the public world, in the academic routine, or in the lives of friends, and some refer to other poems; many of them refer to both. Some, like Northumbrian May Day, reflect on incongruities between literature and life; others, like Border Ballad, on unexpected congruities.

Click here to read Error messages by Dermot Killingley on the Newcastle University Arts Computing Literary Links page

Other Edens

B10. Killingley, Siew-Yue. Other Edens: Poems of Love and Conflict.

0 947722 15 7. £7.50 (UK); £9.70 (overseas). 2000

The poems in this collection, including five Easter sequences, reflect on our imperfect understanding of paradise, both divine and secular, and on its human translation through time, action and memory into other Edens where, in our ignorance ‘Of the miracles of love’, conflict, partings, war and death become part of our experience. The thirty-four illustrations of sixteenth-century woodcuts and engravings by Holbein, Dürer, and others provide a further dimension for meditation.

gifts

B11. Radice, William, Gifts: Poems 1992-1999.

0 947722 16 5. £10.00 (UK); £13.00 (overseas). January 2002.

Click here to find other works by William Radice.
Click here to find out more about William Radice.

These poems, reflecting the whole of the author’s life, draw on his involvement with India and with Bengali literature, on his interest in Germany, on his love of music, and on his longstanding endurance of migraine.

The poems are allotted to nine characters, male and female of different ages, who meet, interact and eventually merge into one voice. Many different verse forms are used, some traditional, some highly innovative, especially in ‘Nine rasas’, in which each character is given a rasa (‘flavour’ in Indian aesthetics) and a rhythm to match.

The poems may be performed as well as read, and range in mood from sorrow to joy, from anger to laughter and from despair to hope. Together, they strive for balance—of the moral, the emotional and the rational—and for a whole and steady view of the twentieth century and the awesome twenty-first century.

‘William Radice allows a lifelong academic fascination with India and Bengali literature, including the works of Rabindranath Tagore, to colour this rich collection of poems in which each character has an idividual rasa, or flavour, using a combination of traditional and innovative verse.’ Waterstone’s homepage, February 2002: Waterstone’s recommends

‘William Radice, Bengali scholar and distinguished translator of Rabindranath Tagore, has produced a volume of poems whose title and theme draw on India’s ancient and rich tradition of the giving and receiving of gifts. This is not to say that there are not other themes and motifs running through thecollection, but this particular one is central and organizational, operating at several levels. Thus in the beautifully limpid poem which closes his book, based on the final scene from Richard Strauss’s opera Arabella, we find these lines: “The water runs on,/The gifts never end:/Gifts received and returned”...

...William Radice’s verses are not a poetry of the inner voice, even when articulating his characters’ inmost thoughts. Rather they are projected situations, messages, and/or states of mind dramatic in nature and often making use of parody, rhyming quatrains, and humourous couplets or the popular song and German Lied structures of the book’s final section. Hence the note on possible performance; so that they could well be produced on radio.

The strength and indeed subtlety of this collection are...to be located not so much in individual poems as in the volume as a whole—in the themes, motifs and personae interlinking and giving complexity to the more than fifty or so poems and sequences it contains. Thus what we get is a fairly close web whose colours, lines and patterns are accumulative, and whose effects build up like the interweaving of musical motifs, something to be expected from an author who, on the evidence of this work alone, is passionately interested in and knowledgeable about classical music and ballet. However, a few poems do stand out—notably the final poem already discussed...’ Temenos Academy Review

Pilgrim's Progress

B12. Bunyan, John. The Pilgrim’s Progress. Adapted as a Play, with Embellishments by Siew-Yue Killingley.

0 947722-17-3. £8.50 (UK); £11.00 (overseas). 2002

Illustrated with engravings and pictures from earlier editions of The Pilgrim’s Progress and with rehearsal photographs of the first production.

First performed by the St. Tom’s Players in Newcastle from 22nd to 24th November 2001, with proceeds to St. Oswald’s Jigsaw Appeal, which raises funds to build a children’s section to St. Oswald’s Hospice in order to benefit children with life-limiting diseases.
See also above B. 7: Siew-Yue Killingley’s Northumbrian Passion Play.

Would you like to join the St. Tom's Players or hear more about their activities? Click here to find out more and to view rehearsal photographs of The Pilgrim’s Progress.

The Pilgrim’s Progress is told as a dream, in which the author sees Christian leave his home because he has read in the Bible that God has condemned the city in which he lives. His wife and children refuse to follow him; not that they are particularly wicked, but because they have not realised that nobody can be saved except by God’s grace. He meets people who help him on his way, and others who lead him astray, until he eventually crosses the river of death and enters the Celestial City. In the second part, written later, his wife follows him, with her sons, until she too crosses the river, leaving the young men to continue their own journey through life.

In this verse and prose adaptation, Siew-Yue Killingley has kept the vividness and pace of Bunyan’s direct English, retaining the episodes which best reveal the inspiration of the writer. Some of them are also associated with phrases that people are likely to have heard of, such as the ‘Slough of Despond’, ‘Vanity-Fair’ and ‘the Valley of the Shadow of Death’. She has included material from Bunyan’s second part, in which the ruptured union between man and wife is made whole again. John Bunyan is there to tell us his dream, and so are Master Worldly-Wiseman, Judge Hate-good, and Giant Despair—with his strong-willed wife, Mistress Diffidence. There are fights, and laughs, and some opportunities for the audience to join in singing hymns, including Bunyan’s own ‘Who would true valour see’.

‘Siew-Yue Killingley’s adaptation of The Pilgrim’s Progress is a veritable literary successor to Bunyan himself. Never fearing the anxiety of the influential, Killingley walks hand in hand with her literary master, respectfully, yet also embellishing (in her own term) his dramatic qualities in a play which is quite contemporary, yet of all times. No great literature exists in isolation. Here is a dramatic performance which embraces the two millenia of the Christian tradition. It is never inappropriately modern, yet, like Bunyan himself, speaks directly to the modern audience. Deeply Christian, it is never awkwardly so, for all great art moves outside the boundaries of particularities to speak with a universal voice to all peoples of all persuasions who share a common humanity.

Killingley is a practised and unobtrusive poet. Her verse comes easily, and like all true art, masks its discipline with an easy and natural grace. Like all plays, this should be seen...its energy is quickly apparent in its wit, its sympathy and above all its honesty.’Journal of Literature and Theology

A once-green vine

B13. Killingley, Siew-Yue. A Once-green Vine: Poems of Joy and Despair.

0-947722-18-1. £8.00 (UK); £10.50 (overseas). 2003

The poems in this collection were largely written between autumn 2000 and spring 2003, except for the ones from Northumbrian Passion Play used in ‘The suffering servant’. They reflect on the way in which joy and despair are often aspects of each other, as when ‘A captive of memory, the mind meanders/Down the cadences of vanished joys,/Questioning their veracity, even their validity’. As children of ‘A once-green vine’, we prefer the ‘sour juice’ of man’s law to the sweet joy of God’s law ‘provoking the world/To love’ and to look ‘evermore out-wards to others’. Rejecting this simple call and preferring to ‘be free to explore/Our darker humanity’, we have already filled the beginning of this century with ‘the hapless cries of children of war’.


C. Religion and Philosophy

Click here to find out more about the annual Sanskrit Tradition in the Modern World (STIMW) seminars, to whom several authors in Sections C and D have contributed. See also items C7 and D2 below.

A Handbook of Hinduism for Teachers

C1. Killingley, Dermot (ed.), A Handbook of Hinduism for Teachers. Second edn. (First edn. pub. by Newcastle upon Tyne Education Committee in 1980.)

0 9507918 6 5. £10.00 non-net (UK); £13.00 (overseas). Illustrated. 1984.

Material from this book was allowed by the publisher to be included in the following two books by David Self: The Macmillan Education Course Book 3 (Macmillan, 1987) and The Lower School Assembly Book (Hutchinson Education, 1987).

‘For an informative summary of Hinduism it can hardly have been bettered ...refreshingly practical, with classroom situations handled sensitively.’ Bulletin of the Association for Religious Education

‘It is a most practical reference and source book, full of useful information and classroom ideas ...There is an emphasis on what Hindus actually do, both in India and Britain ...The book is illustrated with simple but effective maps and drawings.’ Times Educational Supplement

Krishna milking © Grevatt &Grevatt 1984

Krishna milking

Nandi, Shiva’s mount © Grevatt &Grevatt 1984

nandi

‘This excellent volume has useful material for both primary and secondary teachers, including an anthology of Hindu stories for younger children.’ Resource: Journal of the University of Warwick Institute of Education

‘It will be a very useful tool for those who find themselves teaching Hinduism in schools. It is clear, reasonably simple, and accurate.’ The Expository Times

'This is ... a splendid and much-needed aid for teachers ...It is produced by teachers for teachers and it is not only a guide to resources but a valuable resource in itself ...’ Media Review


C2. Killingley, Dermot, and Killingley, Siew-Yue, Hinduism Iconography Pack.

0 9507918 9 X. £2.50 non-net (UK); £3.25 (overseas). 1984.

Four A4 size pictures for colouring or use as posters, with explanatory text. Individual pages of notes or illustrations on their own on thinner 80 gsm paper without folder available at 30p each plus 15% p & p (UK) or 30% p & p (overseas).

Ganesha with his mount, a rat
(in a colouring suggestion in water colours by the artist)
© Siew-Yue Killingley 1984

ganesha

Sarasvati accompanied by her goose, playing the vina
(in a colouring suggestion in water colours by the artist)
© Siew-Yue Killingley 1984

sarasvati

‘...line drawings of Ganesha, Vishnu, Lakshmi and Saraswati accompanied by a clearly written text which explains the details of the iconography.’ Resource: Journal of the University of Warwick Institute of Education











A Net Cast Wide

C3. Lipner, Julius (ed.), A Net Cast Wide: Investigations into Indian Thought in Memory of David Friedman.

0 9507918 8 1. £8.50 (UK); £10.05 (overseas). 1986.

Five scholars working on various aspects of Indian religion and philosophy pay tribute to their teacher, the late David Friedman. Rita Gupta discusses Buddhist theories of causation; Bimal Matilal discusses different Buddhist and Hindu analyses of our awareness; Julius Lipner presents a contrastive study of Shankara’s and Ramanuja’s interpretations of the word brahman in the Bhagavad-Gita; Dermot Killingley examines the syllable om in the Veda; and Trevor Ling discusses the role of city and country in the history of Buddhism.

‘The title of the book refers to David Friedman’s wide interests and the book contains an appropriate spread of essays on important topics relating to Buddhism and Hinduism ...Julius Lipner’s [essay] is a must for any serious student and teacher of both Vedanta philosophy and the Bhagavad Gita.’ Shap Mailing, 1987

‘Killingley’s study ... has succeeded brilliantly in synthesizing and summarizing the complex amalgam of ritual, mythological and metaphysical ideas surrounding the notion of Speech in the Vedic hymns, Brahmanas and Upanishads. I shall make this essay required reading for all my students studying Hinduism, and recommend that others do the same.’ Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society

C4. Rammohun Roy, The Only True God: Works on Religion. Selected and translated from Bengali and Sanskrit by Dermot Killingley.

0 9507918 1 4. £5.50 net (UK); £7.15 (overseas). 1982.

The four works selected and translated are: the Vedanta-Sutras; Reply to Utsavananda; Preface to the Mandukya Upanishad, and Reply to a Gosvamin.

‘Das schmale Bändchen bietet eine willkommene Einführung in die theologischen Grundgedanken Rammohun Roys ... Die Einführung und Bemerkungen des Übersetzers liefern knappe Hinweise auf die Umstände der Entstehung und die Grundgedanken des übersetzten Textes. Zusammen mit Glossar, Fußnoten und der sorgfältigen Gestaltung des Typoskripts...belegen sie die sorgfältige und systematische Arbeitsweise des Übersetzers.’ Orientalistische Literaturzeitung

israel's mysterious god

C5. Robinson, Bernard, Israel’s Mysterious God: An Analysis of Some Old Testament Narratives.

0 947722 0 1 7. £7.50 (UK); £9.75 (overseas), 1986.

God is always elusive, mysterious and unknowable. The narratives in which this motif is studied are: the Joseph story, the Book of Joshua, Ruth, the Saul narrative, the Elijah story, Job, Ecclesiastes, and Jonah.

‘The material is well and informatively handled, the style clear and the argument persuasive.’ The Society for Old Testament Study Book List

‘R[obinson] bases his analyses on sound scholarly findings while refusing to follow slavishly more detailed studies and avoiding their technicalities.’ The Catholic Biblical Quarterly

‘Dans sa présentation, à la fois claire et profonde, des récits qu'il nous invite à relire, Robinson tient compte des résultats obtenus par la méthode historico-critique et de l’esprit de la nouvelle critique littéraire.’ Revue Biblique

C6. Wright, T. R. (ed.) John Henry Newman: A Man for Our Time?

0 9507918 4 9. £5.50 net (UK); £7.15 (overseas). 1983.

Contains an introduction by the editor and six essays which focus on different aspects of Newman’s life and work: Michael Ramsey on Newman the Anglican; T. R. Wright on Newman as novelist; Ian Gregor on Newman’s The Idea of a University as a possible text for today; P.J. FitzPatrick on Newman’s Apologia and his dishonesty in the controversy with Kingsley; J. D. Holmes on Newman’s reaction to the definition of Papal Infallibility; and Bernard Reardon on Newman and the Grammar of Assent.

‘I found Wright’s...contribution...particularly stimulating...’ The Month

C7. Williams, Yvonne, and McElvaney, Michael, Aurobindo and Zaehner on the Bhagavad-Gita.

0 9508149 2 X. (S. Y. Killingley imprint. No. 1 in the series The Sanskrit Tradition in the Modern World (STIMW) Papers.) £4.00 (UK); £5.20 (overseas), 1988.

Yvonne Williams analyses Aurobindo’s methods of interpretation and shows how he reconciles his own ideas with those of the text. Michael McElvaney discusses the ways in which Zaehner’s interpretation was influenced by his Christian convictions and his concern with mysticism.

‘...two worthwhile essays ...’ Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society

‘Suitable for upper-level undergraduates and graduate libraries.’ Religious Studies Review

‘Both papers are informative, balanced and critical. Teachers and sixthformers who are studying the Bhagavad Gita will find them well worth reading.’ World Religions in Education

Click here to find out more about the annual Sanskrit Tradition in the Modern World (STIMW) seminars. See also item D2 below.

rammohun roy

C8. Killingley, Dermot, Rammohun Roy in Hindu and Christian Tradition: The Teape Lectures 1990.

ISBN 0 947722 07 6 (Hbk): £20.00 (UK); £22.75 (overseas). 1993.
No paperbacks left; only hardbacks available.

A revised and expanded version of the lectures given in the autumn of 1990 in United Theological College, Bangalore, Bishop’s College, Calcutta, and St. Stephen’s College, Delhi. Examines the background and characteristics of Rammohun’s religious thought, and his use of scripture in his encounters with Hindus and Christians.

‘...useful and accessible...Provides a very helpful guide through the many and varied books about Rammohun...[Dr. Killingley]...is able to show how Rammohun skillfully wrote to suit his audience...In the past, this has confused many interpreters who have been led to claim him as their own...The book concludes with an extensive and very useful bibliography.’ Transactions of the Unitarian Historical Society

‘Dermot Killingley provides us in this fascinating book with a much more rounded picture of the man than has been available up till now, while gently correcting the misconceptions of other scholars, so that we can at last discern the man from the legend...Killingley is to be congratulated on giving us so full and clear a picture of the man and his writings and on doing it so concisely. He sheds fresh light on the subject, from the significant new detail about Rammohun’s early life to the careful analysis of his vocabulary.’ Bulletin of the British Association for the Study of Religions.

‘It is an invaluable and well-documented source of information for anyone interested in Rammohun’s controversies with Hindu traditionalists, Christians, and Unitarians, and therefore an important addition to research on interreligious dialogue in modern India. It is also one of the clearest expositions to date of the development of Rammohun’s own thinking.’ Hindu-Christian Studies

C9. Dorothy Postle and Margaret Marsh. Hastings Rashdall: Dean of Carlisle, 1917-1924.

ISBN 0 9535222 0 2. £10.00 (UK); £13.00 (overseas). 2000.

Published by Dorothey Postle and distributed by Grevatt & Grevatt.

‘Chronologically and making full use of local newspapers and other sources, the authors...sketch a profile of the Dean at work...This tribute to a churchman of forthright ideas and practical links with the community is of considerable local interest. Thoroughly researched and presented in an unpedantic style, it honours the memory and achievements of a man of remarkable talents, assured vision and vigorous participation in so many features of Cumbrian life...This tribute to a churchman of forthright ideas and practical links with the community is of considerable local interest. Thoroughly researched and presented in an unpedantic style, it honours the memory and achievements of a man of remarkable talents, assured vision and vigorous participation in so many features of Cumbrian life.’ The Keswick Reminder


D. Society in India

D1. Killingley, D. M. (1900-1980). Farewell the Plumed Troop: A Memoir of the Indian Cavalry 1919-1945.

Edited by Dermot Killingley and Siew-Yue Killingley from papers deposited in the Centre of South Asian Studies in Cambridge.

ISBN 0947722 04 1. £12.95 (UK); £16.80 (0verseas). 1990.

Written by a former lieutenant-colonel in the Indian Cavalry in his seventies. The author had served in Iraq after World War I, and in many parts of India and what is now Pakistan, taking part in rescue operations after the Quetta earthquake of 1935. He was later ordained priest. Written with sensitivity, wit and compassion, with a rare understanding of people, religious tolerance, and ideas about war and colonization well ahead of his time.

‘...an engrossing story of army life in India.’ Asian Affairs

‘Autobiographical works by those who served in a military or civilian capacity in India before Independence are many, but few among the military have shown a greater degree of affection for, or understanding of, India and its people than this writer, who does so without being condescending or sentimental ... The impression received from this book is of the courtesy and respect shown by DMK towards people of a society unlike his own.’ Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society

hindu ritual

D2. Killingley, Dermot, Menski, Werner, and Firth, Shirley. Hindu Ritual and Society.

ISBN 0 947722 06 8. (S. Y. Killingley imprint. No. 2 in the STIMW Papers.) £8.95 (UK); £11.65 (overseas). 1991.

Dermot Killingley on ‘Vara and caste in Hindu apologetic’; Werner Menski on ‘Change and continuity in Hindu marriage rituals’; Shirley Firth on ‘Changing patterns in Hindu death rituals in Britain’.

‘All three lucidly treat similar themes. Above all, they relate the complexity of the issues they address to the notion of dharma applying differently to different groups, to regional variation and to non-Sanskritic as well as Sanskritic traditions...The status of women concerns them all...For teachers, Killingley’s paper is particularly helpful in the way it distinguishes between varna and jati, looks at interrelationships and examines how the term “caste” has been used, often confusingly. Menski and Firth discuss the constraints on and opportunities for Hindu ritual in British situations, giving detailed descriptions...For teachers of Hinduism who wish to get beyond misleading generalisations, this is a vital resource.’ World Religions in Education 1992/3

‘If you are teaching Hinduism to A level these three excellent papers by leading British academics form essential and much needed reading for you and your A level candidates...All three papers help us to move away from bookish theory about Hinduism to acknowledge its current reality and its on-going development: aspects which even A level examiners are recognising at last! Highly Recommended. ’Look! Hear! The Resource Magazine for Religious and Social Education in Church and School

‘[The papers] explore different aspects of the [Sanskrit] tradition’s response to changing circumstances in the last two centuries. What shines through the collection is the richness of the resources available to contemporary Hinduism in this task...[Menski’s] study is doubly interesting, exploring on the one hand the problems which a multicultural society poses for the English legal system; and on the other, the pragmatic demands which the legal aspects of marriage in England make on Hindu ritual.’ The Expository Times

‘This is an excellent book ... based on sound textual scholarship and detailed fieldwork.’ Punjab Research Group (PGR) Newsletter No. 4, 1992

Click here to find out more about the annual Sanskrit Tradition in the Modern World (STIMW) seminars. See also item C7 above.


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Last update on 27th March 2004.